After Persistent Cyber Engagement Comes Gates, Guards and Guns

Back View in the System Control Center Operator Working. Multiple Screens Showing Technical Data.
Back View in the System Control Center Operator Working. Multiple Screens Showing Technical Data.

By James Van de Velde

James Van de Velde is an Associate Professor at the National Intelligence University as well as Adjunct Faculty at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown University. The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy or position of the US Government, the Department of Defense, or the National Intelligence University.    

This Cyber Viewpoint comes from James Van de Velde, Associate Professor at the National Intelligence University as well as Adjunct Faculty at Johns Hopkins and Georgetown University. The views expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official policy position of the U.S. Government, the Department of Defense, or the National Intelligence University.

Now that the Commander, U.S. Cyber Command, has told the world that United States Department of Defense cyber forces will be pushing back against cyber adversaries wherever possible, including defending against malicious activity inside adversary and third-party networks, has the cyber domain challenge been solved? No one should be thinking that the adversary will now be resigned to defeat. It is unlikely in the extreme that Russian and Chinese cyber experts are now thinking, ‘it was great while it lasted; our advantage in cyberspace is over.’

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