Cyber Warfare Beyond Domains

By Jacquelyn G. Schneider

Jacquelyn G. Schneider is an Assistant Professor in the Center for Naval Warfare Studies and a core faculty member of the Center for Cyber Conflict Studies at the U.S. Naval War College. Her research focuses on the intersection of technology, national security, and political psychology with a special interest in cyber, unmanned technologies, and Northeast Asia. Schneider holds a B.A. in Economics-Political Science from Columbia University, a M.A. in Political Science from Arizona State University, and a PhD in Political Science from George Washington University.

In 2010, then-Deputy Secretary of Defense William J. Lynn III made a pivotal decision for the future of cyberspace and the U.S. military: He saw to it that the U.S. Department of Defense declared cyberspace a “domain” of warfare.

This decision created the organizational impetus for the DoD to organize and equip forces to defend and attack from cyberspace. Lynn anticipated that the future of warfare would be determined by competitions for information and that without the ability to organize for missions in cyberspace, the DoD would be unable to ensure the digital freedom it needed to win modern wars. Since that time, the DoD has not only developed an overarching Cyber Strategy and stood up an entire Cyber Command with more than 6,000 personnel, and has also brought to initial operating capability 133 teams for its Cyber Mission Force. Under the auspices of the cyberspace domain, the DoD has made huge strides to defeat and deter adversaries in cyberspace.

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