Infighting Threatens Mali Peace, Creating Space for Al Qaida

Bottom Line: A 2015 peace accord between the Mali government and ethnic Tuaregs in the north of the country has failed to produce economic or security benefits for the northern tribe, with each side blaming the other for the failure of the deal. The dispute could devolve once again into civil war, and create an opening for al-Qaida in the Islamic Maghreb (AQIM) and other terrorist groups to further fortify their continuing operations in the northern part of the country.

Background: Mali achieved independence from France in 1960, but has since been plagued by civil wars fought between the central government and the Tuareg ethnic group based in the northern part of the country.

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