The newest ransomware attack called NotPetya has re-ignited the debate ongoing since the earlier WannaCry attack. Cybersecurity experts, policymakers, and citizens affected have all asked: who is to blame for these attacks? The underlying vulnerability in both these attacks is based on a Microsoft vulnerability, which was discovered and extensively used by the National Security ...

As the dust settles on last Tuesday’s NotPetya malware outbreak, it is increasingly evident that this was not a ransomware, money-making attack at all; rather it was a targeted, destructive cyberattack against Ukraine. It utilized deception in which it was designed to look like ransomware but wasn’t. It targeted obscure ...

The worldwide WannaCry ransomware, which targeted computers running the Microsoft Windows operating system, was an admonition to everyone who connects to cyberspace – especially the U.S. intelligence community.  WannaCry was only the most recent example in a long line of high-profile cyber attacks that demonstrated how the timely application of ...

Despite the insistence of many pundits and technical experts, the recent WannaCry outbreak was – mercifully – a poorly organized attack with a poorly constructed tool. It was, in fact, the best of all worst-case scenarios. This salvo – and the attendant global reaction – only highlights the degree of gross ...

Cybercrime is market-driven, with criminals gravitating toward models that maximize their return on investment. Criminals will divest and lessen efforts that have lower returns in favor of campaigns that improve profitability. Regrettably, we’re seeing this happen with ransomware, which is an extremely efficient crime and is growing both in popularity ...

Everybody who depends on digital information systems, which is everybody, saw a few glimpses of silver lining from the WannaCry ransomware attack that took the planet by storm Friday. For one thing, the attacks slowed, and there was no massive second wave. “The good news is, the infection rates have ...

Who’s to blame for the astonishingly successful ransomware attack sweeping the planet? Microsoft, the information technology giant whose popular Windows operating systems harbored the flaw malicious hackers exploited to paralyze at least 200,000 computers and systems in 150 countries, is pointing the finger at Washington. “Repeatedly, exploits in the hands ...

Friday’s global attack on computers in some 150 countries was clearly a wake-up call. It took government systems offline, affected corporations of all kinds, took critical infrastructure systems out of service and even changed the agenda of the G7 meeting in Italy. But, it was an attack carried out without ...

Over the weekend, businesses and critical services like banks, hospitals, telecommunications services and transportation hubs around the world were hit with a cyber attack that locked users out of their own systems using a form of ransomware known as WannaCry. The potential loss of data may lead not only to ...

In response to the massive Wannacry ransomware attack that infected over 200,000 computers around the world, Brad Smith, Microsoft’s President and Chief Legal Officer, wrote a blog post Sunday night on lessons from the cyberattack—and the “urgent need for collective action” to keep people safe online. Below is an excerpt. ...

As businesses wake up to the possibility that the WannaCry ransomware tool will spread beyond the already estimated 200,000 computers already infected across Europe, experts are calling for a stronger public-private partnership on cybersecurity. The wake up call from this latest attack: there was a patch that would have shored ...

This week I’m attending the annual RSA Conference in San Francisco, where government and industry leaders have come together to discuss the looming challenges and newest tools in cybersecurity. Throughout the week, I’ll be speaking with experts, bringing you insights on the threats emanating from cyberspace, ranging from ransomware and ...

With the pervasive growth of smart phone and tablet use, cybersecurity professionals are worried these devices could present new vulnerabilities to company systems. The Cipher Brief spoke with Michael Covington, Vice President of Product at Wandera, about the growing threats emanating from mobile devices and how he sees companies potentially ...

The Cipher Brief’s Luke Penn-Hall sat down with Steve Grobman, Intel Fellow and Chief Technology Officer for Intel Security, at the annual Black Hat cybersecurity conference, which took place in early August. Steve discussed how he views the threat from ransomware evolving. The Cipher Brief: How do you see ransomware ...

In February, Hollywood Presbyterian Hospital very publicly paid $17,000 to regain access to its files after being infected with a type of malware called ransomware. As the name suggests, ransomware encrypts all files on a computer until the victim pays a ransom to the attacker. This hack, though limited in ...

Healthcare providers represent an attractive target for hackers due to the wealth of information they store about their patients. The Cipher Brief Spoke to Greg Porter, founder of information security consulting firm Allegheny Digital, about the nature of the cyber-threat for the healthcare industry. He says that healthcare providers should ...

On February 5th, Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center lost access to its computers after being infected with ransomware – a type of malware that hold files hostage until a ransom is paid. Eventually, the hospital paid $17,000 to regain control of its systems, and started a national dialogue about cybersecurity in ...

Cyber-crime and cybersecurity are locked in a perpetual competition – whenever one advances, the other changes to counter it. With every iteration of this contest, both sides become more nuanced, more complex, and begin to exploit more novel ways of gaining advantage. One of the more interesting types of malware ...

The Internet of Things is poised to become as revolutionary as the Internet itself, but there are some major threats that must be dealt with first. J.J. Thompson, the founder of the cybersecurity firm Rook Security, spoke with the Cipher Brief about how ransomware could impact the Internet of Things ...