The field of quantum physics, a century-old science, which found that particles have unique and unexpected properties at the smallest scale, is now at the cutting edge of research into revolutionary new technologies that could dramatically impact U.S. defense and national security. From gravitational sensors that can detect submarines underwater ...

Quantum computing and other technologies, which seek to exploit the bizarre behaviors of particles at the microscopic quantum level, have the potential to revolutionize computing, sensor systems, and a wide array of other information systems. As this theoretical field nears practical implementation, The Cipher Brief’s Fritz Lodge asked Dr. Brad ...

Imagine a sensor that could instantly detect nuclear submarines deep underwater, a supercomputer that can break the strongest encryption in the blink of an eye, or a worldwide satellite network of theoretically unbreakable communications. These are just a few of the capabilities promised by quantum physics, a century-old science, which ...

Earlier this month, Director of National Intelligence (DNI) James Clapper described reaching out to the private sector as a “daunting task,” and that “there is still much to be done,” to improve information sharing in the age of digital communications. Brad Brekke, the FBI’s director of private sector engagement, added ...

All Americans – including both company executives and law enforcement officials across the nation – want to keep our country safe and secure. This shouldn’t be a shocking statement, but so often we hear the debates around encryption, privacy, and data security framed as a battle between law enforcement or ...

Apple, Inc., moved to vacate an order issued by a United States Magistrate Judge pursuant to the All Writs Act that directed Apple to provide the FBI with reasonable technical assistance to enable the search an iPhone seized during the investigation of the December 2, 2015 mass shootings in San ...

It seems like the cyber domain has recently been awash in controversy. From major hacks that compromise the information of millions of people, to bitter legal disputes between tech giants and law enforcement, to a steadily expanding number of threats, cybersecurity has never seemed so crucial. Former CIA Acting Director ...

The Justice Department has dropped its legal effort to force Apple to unlock the iPhone used by one of the shooters in the San Bernardino terrorist attack after the government found another way to crack the phone — without the tech giant’s help. With no legal precedent set in the ...

The interesting thing about the Apple vs. FBI encryption debate is that that there is little disagreement that encryption is a valuable tool for protecting individuals’ privacy and preventing information from falling into the wrong hands.  There is also little disagreement that we want law enforcement and intelligence agencies to ...

The current dispute between Apple and the FBI amplifies the ongoing debate between U.S. tech firms and law enforcement agencies about encryption.  At issue in this case is how to access an iPhone that belonged to one of the people responsible for the San Bernardino shooting in December 2015. The ...

Apple should not be coerced into hacking into the San Bernardino shooter's iPhone, and we must get to a point as a society where law enforcement does not even make such a request. Mobile devices are not mere repositories for addresses, appointments, and email. As many people use them now, ...

The current conflict between Apple and the FBI over developing a means to circumvent security features on the iPhone has reignited the tense debate about the tradeoff between security and privacy in the U.S. The Cipher Brief spoke to Robert Eatinger, former Senior Deputy General Counsel at the CIA, about ...

Apple’s dispute with the FBI has caused a resurgence of the debate about encryption in the United States, but the tech industry is working on creating a new type of computer that would turn the debate upside down. Quantum computers have long been a staple of science fiction, but recent ...

Quantum computing is poised to usher in a new era in computing by allowing access to unprecedented speed and new problem solving capabilities. The Cipher Brief spoke to Robert Ewald, President of D-Wave U.S. – the only company currently selling functional quantum computers. He said that the quantum computing market ...

Debates about encryption have been a hot button issue for some time, as privacy advocates and law-enforcement agencies debate about the merits of privacy versus security. However, a revolutionary advance in computing is just around the corner – and it could change the entire debate. Quantum computers have the potential ...

The court order demanding Apple create an encryption-breaking tool was never about a single iPhone.  A disclosure in a federal court yesterday revealed that the Justice Department has made at least nine similar demands to Apple.  Officials in the department have sought to convince the world that this case is ...

As the Director of the National Counterterrorism Center, Matthew Olsen oversaw the integration and analysis of all intelligence related to terrorism.  He recently co-authored a report for Harvard's Berkman Center for Internet and Society about the ongoing encryption debate, and discussed the report with The Cipher Brief. The Cipher Brief: ...

Here we go again.  Security vs. privacy.  Round n.   Of course, I'm referring to the aftermath of the horrific ISIS attacks in Paris.  What did we (the U.S., France and like minded societies) know before the event?  When did we know it?  Could we have known more?  What may have ...

The debate about “Going Dark” has reignited following the tragic attacks in Paris last week. There have been claims the terrorists used encrypted communications to coordinate their attack and avoid detection by intelligence services– creating what is, essentially, the worst case scenario envisioned by advocates for government access to encrypted ...

The government is in a bind – it wants to stop criminals and terrorists, but it also wants to support strong encryption. Navigating this quandary has been a problem for a while, and it is entering a new phase. Specifically, the government appears to be shifting its focus from compulsion ...

“Are we so mistrustful of government—and of law enforcement—that we are willing to let bad guys walk away...willing to leave victims in search of justice?”  – FBI Director James Comey, Brookings, October 16, 2014 Strong encryption appears to be safe – for now. In Congressional testimony on Thursday, FBI Director James ...

According to press reports, the White House has considered and rejected four options to address the so-called “going dark” problem where the growing ubiquity of encryption is making it harder for law enforcement agencies to collect evidence and investigate crimes. Options considered include adding an encrypted port to devices, using ...

Mike Rogers is a former Congressman who served as the chairman of the House Permanent Select Committee on Intelligence. In a discussion with The Cipher Brief, Rogers said it is critical for the government and private sector to find a solution to the encryption dilemma that satisfies the needs of ...

Our government should not want a backdoor to encrypted messages. The government says it wants to have a special set of keys to decrypt any encrypted data transmitted across the Internet. The computer industry says it isn’t possible.  The government says it is a matter of national security. The industry ...